Collectibles and Jewelry Content – How to Write Collectible Jewelry Articles

If you go online and search Jewelry topics you will find that there are a number of books, and articles on this subject. One of the biggest topics in the category of jewelry is collectible jewelry. Apparently, there is a huge following for those authors that specialize in this venue. And many of them make quite a bit of money selling these articles to magazines, or newspapers.

There are many authors that have columns that run regularly and are syndicated around the country, it’s their only job and they make a good a bit of money as writers producing content of this type.

When writing “how to articles” on collectible jewelry you need to get into the mind of your reader, you need to consider what they are searching online, the types of questions they are asking, and gear your articles to answering those points of curiosity. One of the most important questions people ask is how do they value the collectible jewelry they already have, or the handed down jewelry that has been in their family for generations.

Another question is; “How Much Can I Get on eBay If I Sell This Collectible Jewelry?” And along the same lines is “how do I know the collectible jewelry I buy on eBay is really worth the money?”

These are all important things to the readers of such articles. As long as you are asking questions of the consumers, and collectors of such jewelry, and then answering those questions in your articles you will produce excellent content for the Internet, magazines, newsletters, and newspapers. Please consider all this.

Invest in Tomorrow’s Collectible Jewelry Today

Wouldn’t it be great to have a time machine that would allow you to go back and buy today’s collectible jewelry at yesterday’s prices? You can do the next best thing by buying jewelry today that will become sought after in the future. Here are eight tips to help you in your search for tomorrow’s collectible jewelry.

1. Quality and craftsmanship

Quality pieces command quality prices. Cheap jewelry is a dime a dozen at flea markets and resale shops. But quality pieces with crystal stones that still shimmer and faux pearls that have retained their luster paired with metal that hasn’t had its finish rubbed or flaked off, will always hold appeal for collectors.

2. Pieces hallmarked with the designer’s name

A designer’s name or mark on a piece adds instant value. It gives an item the cachet of the entire breadth of the designer’s work. Look for a hallmark on the back of pins or brooches, near the clasp of necklaces and bracelets, or on a separate hanging tag in the same finish as the metal.

3. Name recognition

Not every designer becomes well-known. Every collector of vintage jewelry probably has at least one piece in their collection with an obscure hallmark they can’t identify, and that’s fine if they like the piece. But when they come across a piece with an instantly recognizable name, they don’t hesitate to scoop it up. They know they’ve found something special — and they know they’ll be able to sell it in the future to someone who will appreciate the name as well as the style.

4. Small production per piece

The fewer pieces of an item there are in existence, the higher the demand and price. Opt for the offbeat or unusual — as long as you like it — over a generic piece with mass appeal. While both will have resale value if they’re made well, the unique piece should prove harder to find, thus driving up its resale price. If a more expensive item captures your heart, remember that fewer people buy a higher priced item which can create increased demand in the future.

5. Limited Edition pieces

A Limited Edition eliminates the guesswork of how many pieces were made. Limited Edition pieces should be stamped with both the total number in the Edition and the number of each particular piece. For example, piece number 12 in an addition of 250 will most likely be stamped on back “Ltd. Ed. 12/250”. If you buy a piece that isn’t stamped with the actual edition, but instead has a Certificate of Authenticity with that information, be sure to keep the Certificate with the item to ensure you get the optimum resale price in the future.

6. Thematic pieces

Look for pieces that will have crossover appeal to at least two groups of collectors. For example, Christmas jewelry is sought after by both jewelry collectors and Christmas collectors. If it’s an angel, you’ll add angel collectors to your list of potential buyers as well. The more people you have vying for an item, the higher your selling price will be.

7. Assurance of authenticity

Buy from a reputable retailer. Designers in all fields are plagued by knock-offs. An Authorized Reseller protects your investment by ensuring that you’re getting the genuine articles you’re paying for.

8. Buy what you like

This is the Cardinal Rule for collectors. You’ll never go wrong buying what you like. Today’s joy won’t be diminished if you aren’t able to sell something at a profit tomorrow. And if you truly love something — you probably won’t want to part with it anyway!

Remember these eight tips and you’ll have a much better chance of being happy today — and tomorrow — with your jewelry purchases!

Click here for information on one of today’s most prominent jewelry designers.

Vintage Jewelry Lovers – Protect Your Collection With These Jewelry Organizers

What does it mean when we call something vintage? The common misconception is that vintage items are also antiques. While this is often true, it is not an absolute. Vintage items can come from any era or period, even last year. In fact, the word simply means a period of origin or a date of manufacture. An antique, on the other hand, must be at least fifty years old. In this article, we will discuss vintage jewelry and how to keep it safe.

Like most collectibles, jewelry often appreciates in price, especially if it is vintage jewelry. The most expensive types of collectible jewelry are also antiques that were created in and are representative of different eras. The most important eras for jewelry design were Georgian, Early Victorian, Art Nouveau, Edwardian, Art Deco, and Retro.

Any serious collector or professional jeweler could tell you which era a piece of vintage jewelry belonged to on first glance. For example, jewelry from the Georgian Era, the earliest era for vintage jewelry, was handmade, which meant the quality of each piece was inconsistent. The designs were often inspired by nature, with lots of birds and leaves, and jewelers frequently used precious stones to decorate them. Pieces from this era are often over two hundred years old. Needless to say, they are expensive and very rare.

As you might expect, women who own rare collections of vintage jewelry can’t just keep them in a drawer. These pieces are often quite fragile and they can be damaged by dust, debris, or simply by jostling them around. That is why many collectors keep their vintage jewelry in a safe or safety deposit box. But for women who like to show their collections off to friends or perhaps even wear a piece or two on a special occasion, the only practical option is a good jewelry organizer.

There are many different types of organizers, from the classic jewelry box to the more commodious jewelry armoire. The type of organizer that you require depends upon the size and the type of jewelry in your collection. The standard organizer has separate compartments for earrings, rings, broaches, bracelets, and hangers for necklaces so that they don’t get tangled up.

If you are collector who only procures certain types of jewelry, like earrings or necklaces, then you might consider a specialty organizer. Folding earring screens, revolving earring organizers, and tiered earring holders can offer more protection and more space for a specialized collection. Most of these organizers can safely hold and display hundreds of pairs of earrings. For collectors who purchases vintage necklaces, necklace hangers or trees are the easiest way to keep your collection organized and safe.

Of course, most collectors do not own specialized collections. Most vintage jewelry aficionados procure all types of pieces from different eras or periods. They may have a fondness for Early Victorian or Art Nouveau or Art Deco jewelry. But whatever the period, they often need organizers that can store many different types of jewelry from earrings to broaches to necklaces.

The most popular organizer for the home is the upright jewelry valet. Like the standard jewelry box, the valet is designed to sit atop a dresser or on a vanity. It is about twice the size of a standard jewelry box and can accommodate small to medium-size collections. On average, the standard upright jewelry valet has four to six drawers for rings, broaches, pendants, and earrings. It may also have hooks on the inside of the swinging doors for necklaces or bracelets. For safety reasons, we recommend an organizer that has a lock and key.

The next step up from the jewelry valet is the jewelry armoire. These organizers are designed for people with own truly impressive collections that they have amassed over many years. The armoire organizer is available in two versions-the wall-mounted organizer and the free-standing jewelry armoire.